Laura Secord’s Cow

March 6, 2016 at 8:15 am (Fun) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Who do you think of when you think of great Canadian Women?

I think of authors first. The Margarets (Atwood & Laurence), Lucy Maud (Montgomery), Mavis (Gallant) and Alice (Munro) who recently won that big prize! I feel like I should be on a first name basis with them because I’ve read all their writings and so many bios about them that I feel I know them personally. Does this make sense?

I also think history when I think great. There are the Famous Five who used to be on our fifty dollar bill of whom Nellie (why is no one named Nellie anymore) was a member.

96-1-CH-FM16

Lately, I think of Laura Secord when I think great Canadian women. Why? Partly because the War of 1812 has been in my news feed and partly because I recently purchased her chocolate.

There is a dispute as to who really won the War of 1812, the Americans or us? We did, of course (back when we were British). We are the only nation to have successfully burnt down the White House after all!

Laura Secord was a heroine of the War of 1812 because she heard that the Americans intended to surprise the British outpost at Beaver Dams and capture the officer in charge, Lieutenant James FitzGibbon. It was urgent that someone warn FitzGibbon and Laura resolved to take the message herself to FitzGibbon.

Thus a legend was born. The legend of Laura and her cow trekking 30 miles through the woods to warn FitzGibbon. The cow came along to provide cover because a women and a cow in the forest was normal back then!

Laura delivered her message and became legend. We aren’t told what happened to the cow!

Chocolate Bar

A hundred years later, a chocolate company is named in her honor.

In 1913, Frank P. O’Connor, the founder of a small candy business in Toronto selling hand-made chocolates, chose Laura Secord as the name for his company because she “was an icon of courage, devotion and loyalty.”

This has been your Canadian History moment inspired by the latest Canada’s History (formerly The Beaver – a name I much preferred) magazine.

Canadians you have until March 8th to submit your vote for a Great Canadian Woman.

Vote always. Always vote!

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2 Comments

  1. Mom In Saskatoon said,

    Hi G – I read the title of the March 6th entry and the first person to come to my mind was my Grandma Hannah. She came to Canada in 1920, to escape the rising European conflicts. She came from aristocracy, spoke six languages and was a concert pianist. In Saskatchewan she was a pioneer woman, living in a shod house with dirt floors, rode horses, ate rhubarb and endured -40 temperatures. What a lady!
    She not only survived but thrived, becoming a business woman, piano teacher, bookkeeper, wife, mother and my Gran. What a lady! She continued to work into her mid 90’s, not only teaching piano lessons but entering students in Conservatory Exams, theory Exams and holding annual recitals. She continued to do the business books into her early 90’s, and the numbers were all correct. What a lady!
    And a lady she was, I never heard her cuss, saw her drunk or out of control, she spoke of everyone kindly and loved her Lord. What a lady!
    Thanks for your entry, “Who do you think of when you think of great Canadian Women?”, Answer: My Gran Hannah.

    • solitaryspinster said,

      She sounds absolutely amazing!

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